Gene sequencing study reveals unusual mutations in endometriosis

“Our discovery of these mutations is a first step in developing a genetics-based system for classifying endometriosis so that clinicians can sort out which forms of the disorder may need more aggressive treatment and which may not,” says Ie-Ming Shih, M.D., Ph.D., the Richard W. TeLinde Distinguished Professor in the Department of Gynecology & Obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and co-director of the Breast and Ovarian Cancer Program at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Endometriosis occurs when tissue lining the uterus forms and grows outside of the organ, most often into the abdomen. The disease occurs in up to 10 percent of women before menopause and half of those with abdominal pain and infertility problems. In the 1920s, Johns Hopkins graduate and trained gynecologist John Sampson first coined the term “endometriosis” and proposed the idea that endometriosis resulted when normal endometrial tissue spilled out through the fallopian tubes into the abdominal cavity during menstruation.

The new study, Shih says, challenges that view. The presence of the unusual set of mutations they found in their tissue samples, he says, suggests that while the origins of endometriosis are rooted in normal endometrial cells, acquired mutations changed their fate.

For reasons the researchers say are not yet clear, the mutations they identified have some links to genetic mutations found in some forms of cancer. They emphasize that although abnormal tissue growth in endometriosis often spreads throughout the abdominal cavity, the tissue rarely becomes cancerous except in a few cases when ovaries are involved.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *